Florida Aquarium makes huge breakthrough in saving Florida Reef Tract



If you need a dose of inspiration, look no further than the Florida Aquarium. Today, officials from the aquarium announced that they witnessed ridged cactus coral giving birth.

According to scientists at the aquarium that this is the first time this type of coral has reproduced naturally in a lab. This event is extraordinarily encouraging for conservationists working to save Florida’s endangered coral reefs.

Ridged Cactus Coral Spawning

You are witnessing a ridged cactus coral larvae that may one day save our Florida Reef Tract. Until now, the larval release time of this coral had never been recorded. The Florida Aquarium is proud to make history once again, becoming the first in the world to reproduce this coral in human care. Donate now to aid in our conservation efforts to restore our Florida Reefs. #ConservationNeverCloses #FloridaAquarium These adult corals were rescued as part of the The Association of Zoos and Aquariums Florida Reef Tract Rescue Project. Thanks to our partners: MyFWC Florida Fish and Wildlife, NOAA Fisheries Service, NOAA Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Research activities occurred within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and under permit.

Posted by The Florida Aquarium on Wednesday, April 22, 2020

A chance to save Florida’s coral reefs

“You are witnessing a ridged cactus coral larvae that may one day save our Florida Reef Tract,” wrote Florida Aquarium officials in a Facebook post. “Until now, the larval release time of this coral had never been recorded. The Florida Aquarium is proud to make history once again, becoming the first in the world to reproduce this coral in human care.”

Want to help the aquarium with its research? Donate now to aid in their conservation efforts to restore our Florida Reefs. #ConservationNeverCloses #FloridaAquarium

These adult corals were rescued as part of the The Association of Zoos and Aquariums Florida Reef Tract Rescue Project. The Florida Aquarium wanted to extend a thank you to their partners: MyFWC Florida Fish and WildlifeNOAA Fisheries ServiceNOAA Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

Donate to the aquarium to assist in critical research

Research activities occurred within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and under permit.

Follow the Florida Aquarium on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for updates on research breakthroughs, and breathtaking videos and photos from the Tampa icon.

Written by Andrew Harlan

Andrew Harlan

Andrew Harlan is the Editor of thatssotampa.com. Follow him on Twitter @harlanyoungII and Instagram @harlanyoung. Send tips and potential stories to info@thatssotampa.com.